Why One Should Learn Hindi?

Why One Should Learn Hindi?

  • Hindi is spoken by some 366 million people worldwide. Hindi is considered to be the fourth most spoken language in the world, behind Mandarin Chinese, English, and Spanish.
  • Hindi is one of the oldest languages in the world (descended directly from Sanskrit) and is one of the easiest and most logical languages to read, write, and pronounce.
  • The grammar of Hindi is very easy and similar to English grammar. There are virtually no grammatical concepts that do not exist in English.
  • Knowledge of Hindi opens doors to the study of poetry, philosophy, sacred texts, and song that is rare for Westerners. Hindi is a beautiful, ancient, elegant, and expressive language.
  • Travelling through India and learning its culture is more meaningful when you can communicate in Hindi.
  • Indian culture is beginning to permeate Western culture. Many Hindi words are slowly spreading into other languages. Have you ever been to an Indian restaurant? Hindi will probably be on the menu!
  • Western film and music is increasingly influenced by Indian traditions. Indian films (“Bollywood”) are the second most prolific in the world, behind Hollywood. Indian music is becoming increasingly influential in mainstream music in the United States. You may find that Hindi helps you better understand dialogues and lyrics from world superstars.
  • Hindi can be used as a “breakout” language:
    • Hindi and Urdu are generally considered to be the same language written in two different scripts. Both share a common vocabulary and grammar, so that with little effort you will learn both forms very easily.
    • The Devanagari script of Hindi is employed to write several other languages in South Asia, including Nepali, Marathi, and Sanskrit. It is also closely related to Punjabi (in India), Bengali, Gujarati, and Oriya.
    • Urdu’s language script can also be used to write Kashmiri, Punjabi (in Pakistan), occasionally Persian,  and Pashto.
    • So learning these scripts gives you access to many more languages than simply Hindi and Urdu.

 

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